Safra

If I were a boy: Casely-Hayford

In art, British, culture, designer, Fashion, style on March 18, 2011 at 1:11 am

You know, I’ll admit it: I have an obsession with style. So I don’t discriminate. And I’ll never constrict myself my personal style to work settings, social environments or the like. If I come across something I consider to be of good taste, I’m gonna give it credit.

In this case, to come across a family – a black family – with such a strong linage, in fashion, politics – that’s style. And it’s fascinated when you realize that unless you’re deep into a certain culture, you wouldn’t know who the Casely-Hayford clan is. And they’re prominent.


Joseph Ephraim Casely-Hayford was a Lawyer, Author and political leader, better known as “King of the West,” who aimed to improve quality of life for West-Africa’ citizens.


Sydney Casely-Hayford is a highly respected business and financial analysis in Ghana. And look at him, he’s got class.


Dr Augustus Casely-Hayford, art historian with an extremely long title, demonstrates a passion for the craft that it’s only right to reference him when it comes to education on African art.

And then, perhaps, the most ‘fashionable’ of the Casely-Hayford tree is Joe Casely-Hayford and he son, Charlie.

I came upon Joe about four years after his infamous “t-shirt” collaboration with renowned artist Chris Ofili. The shirt, according to the Victoria & Albert museum press release, reflected the ‘ideas of liberations’ demonstrated in the artists’ works. The collaboration was fitting as they were two of the most prevalent in their field at the time. Chris Ofili had gone on to massive success, while Joe, still active, no doubt, went low-pro. However, with the introduction to his son, Charlie, a burgeoning style icon at the tender age of, 23? Casely-Hayford and son are progressively becoming international style icons.

Joe’s most recent venture was collaborating with UK department store chain John Lewis on a collection of menswear pieces:

While Charlie was apart of the ad campaign – shot by Todd Selby – in celebration of Jack Purcell’s 75th anniversary:

2011 was a good year for the father-son duo. It will be exciting to see where the new year will take them, especially when you have this type of talent, and passion. My main thing, though, is that it (they) will hit the younger (black) generation.

I respect figures like Kanye West and their attempts to incorporate high-fashion into our culture. But within cultural circles, there’s a certain swag that’s not flamboyant or showy, it’s intrinsic. There’s a love of art, being punk – in a rebellious sense – and cultivated. And the Casely-Hayford’s represent that. This is important. They are important. A much needed part of black culture.

  1. i like it If I were a boy: Casely-Hayford « On shape in relation to this im your rss reader

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