Safra

Musing: BRPYV

In Fashion, Fashion Heat, Global Musing, history, Icon, style on January 20, 2011 at 6:22 pm


When it comes to fashion, for me, it’s not just about the clothes, but the colourful characters apart of it. I wouldn’t strive to be in fashion had it not been for Diana Vreeland’s authorized, and unauthorized biographies. Or her work during her tenure at Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. Truth be told, if it were based on the strength of fashion alone, I probably wouldn’t really be in it. And I say this because I know has ruthless the fashion world can be.

In contrast to the Anna Wintours and Sarah Mowers of the world, there are the ones that make life – not just fashion – worth living. And finally, thanks to the rise of the Internet, these people are finally becoming forces to be reckoned with.

Anna Wintour has been called the most powerful woman in fashion. So, let’s call Anna Dello Russo its MVP. She has been in fashion for over 20 years, yet, it was not until around 2008 or so, that she came center stage. Never mind Ms. Russo’s 4,000 pairs of shoes, or the apartment she has strictly for her wardrobe. Ms. Russo is a performance artist. Her and fashion are one in the same. Through her inspiration, it is okay to have a passion for fashion in the literal sense. It’s not about impulse buying, it’s about adoring beautiful things, and the escape it can bring. The runway can be like a dream, and to own an item off the runway is but a dream come true.

Ms. Russo is here to fill the void of the late Ms. Blow and all the other people we have lost over the years.

It was a humid day in New York City, and I was having lunch on a patio with a good friend of mine, but I can’t quite remember where. We lamented about our careers, shared ideas, fed off each other, and out of the blue, my friend yelled out “I love you Ms. Yaeger!” I turned around, and this caricature with bright orange hair and long skirt turned around and waved. She was the original Ms. Lynn Yaeger – the fashion reporter with a witty sense of humour. Unfortunately, I didn’t know her as the head fashion journalist at the Village Voice, but I certain feed off her articles in Vogue, T Magazine, and the New York Times. You know, both her and Ms. Russo are quirky, and both take their clothing very seriously -they just have different style.

If I lived in New York City – or London – I’d feel comfortable exploring that whimsical side of my own style. And I say that because cities like Toronto don’t always get it.

According to an article in the Guardian, when it came to trying to pin down Ms. Anna Piaggi’s status in the fashion world, the journalist asked “how did a classically educated girl from a quiet, bookish family become one of fashion’s most outrageous iconoclasts?” Well, because she didn’t want to follow the tradition of her family, of course. The mad hatter who always has something in her hand to match is a fashion force toujour. Her signature blue hair and eye shadow are just thin strokes on such a vast and complex canvas. So much so, that the Victoria and Albert Museum held an exhibition in her honour.

Ms. Piaggi plays by her rules. And for that the fashion world has nothing but respect for her character, both inside, and out.

When I started reading Tatler back in 2007, I had no idea it was a high society British magazine. I only read it after learning Fashion Teleivision, that Isabella Blow was its fashion director. And who was she? A quirky, whimsical character whose over-the-top persona was enough to turn anyone onto the publication That’s all. And since her tragic passing in 2007, admittedly, I have not really read the publication since. She was known as the woman who nurtured careers. For she “found” Philip Treacy and the late, magnificent Alexander McQueen.

Ms. Blow’s life, despite her fame, was tragic. But she paved the way for finding strength in your individual style.

Ms. Diana Vreeland was a polished dresser, but her personality was a colourful as the red sea. And yes, she loved the colour red. She was an unconventional thinker, and unbelievable story teller. And because of her ideas, had a knack for creating something grad out of absolutely nothing. Whether at Vogue or the MET, she was a curator of ideas. Ms. Vreeland turned fashion dreams into reality.

You didn’t understand Ms. Vreeland, you conceptualized her.

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